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In this video, we talk about why worship leaders often fail – it’s because we have unrealistic expectations.

Music is 15% (or less) of what you do as a worship leader

Many times, worship leaders are hired or put in charge of music because they can sing and play an instrument – music is what gets us in the door. But as a worship leader, music is a small fraction of what you need to do to lead well.

Over his years of experience as a worship leader, Fuller breaks down his time like this:

  • 15%: Music
  • 35%: Administration and planning
  • 20%: Meetings
  • 30%: Building releationships

As worship leaders, we need to set clear expectations about what our job will entail. Most of your time will be spent in meetings and planning/administration. The problem is, most musicians are notoriously bad at administration. As you begin or continue your role as a worship leader, find ways to tackle admin – develop systems that help you accomplish it, or ask a volunteer to help you with it. How well you can plan and administrate will have a massive impact on how effectively you lead your teams and your congregation.

Back to: The Worship Manual, Volume 1 > MODULE 2: BUSINESS AND ADMIN FOR MUSICIANS - YOU GOT THE JOB! NOW WHAT?

1 Comment

  1. Are you married with kids? If so, how do you personally navigate that in the context of scratching the artist itch in you?

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